This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Find out more here.

Health Reports and Ethnicity

Telling us about your ethnicity is important because certain variants are more common or have been studied more in certain ethnicities. This means that your ethnicity may impact how relevant a particular report is for you. In addition, some reports explain your results in the context of your ethnicity. You can learn more about how your ethnicity applies to each type of report below:

Health Predisposition*

Our Health Predisposition reports (which include Genetic Health Risk reports) provide information about genetic variants that may influence your chances of developing certain health conditions. The variants in many of our Genetic Health Risk reports have been studied more in certain ethnicities than in others. The effect of these variants on the likelihood of developing a disease is expected to be similar in people of other ethnicities, but the exact numbers are not as well understood. In addition, our reports do not include all possible genetic variants associated with each health condition. For example, many of our Genetic Health Risk reports test for variants that are more common in certain ethnicities than in others. So if you are of a different ethnicity and receive a "Variant(s) not detected" result, it's especially important to remember that you could have a variant not included in our test.

Within the How To Use This Test section of each Genetic Health Risk report, the "Important Ethnicities" area lists the ethnicities in which the variants included in our test are most common or have been studied the most.

Carrier Status*

Our Carrier Status reports provide information about variants that may not affect your health, but could affect your children's health. Some of the conditions we test for in our Carrier Status reports are more common in certain ethnicities. In addition, many of the variants we test for occur more frequently in some ethnicities than in others; this means that we can detect a larger proportion of carriers in certain ethnicities. Because of this, receiving a "Variant not detected" result may be more informative for certain ethnicities than for others For more information about why some Carrier Status reports are more relevant for certain ethnicities, see this help article.

In addition, some of our Carrier Status reports provide unique content that's tailored based on the ethnicity you report to us. For example, if your ethnicity has been well studied, you may receive more detailed information, such as the average carrier frequency in people of your ethnicity or your post-test carrier risk (how likely it is that you're still a carrier if you receive a "Variant(s) not detected" result).

Within the How To Use This Test section of each Carrier Status report, the "Important Ethnicities" area lists ethnicities for which our test is most relevant. Within the About [Condition Name] section of the report, the “Ethnicities most affected” area lists the ethnicities that the condition is most common in. In addition, the Test Details section of the Scientific Details page lists all ethnicities for which we know the carrier detection rate of the test (how well the test is able to detect carriers of a particular ethnicity).

Wellness and Traits

Our Wellness reports provide information about how your DNA may affect your body's response to diet, exercise, and sleep. Traits reports provide information about the genetics behind your appearance and senses. Many of these reports provide information on genetic variants that have been studied more in certain ethnicities than in others. The effect of these variants are expected to be similar in people of other ethnicities, but the exact impact is not as well understood and there may be differences between people of different ethnicities. When available, some reports provide results based on your genetic information paired with the ethnicity you report to us. Additionally, other factors like lifestyle and environment may differentially influence report results of people from different ethnicities. These other factors are not fully captured in the reports.

 

*The 23andMe PGS test uses qualitative genotyping to detect select clinically relevant variants in the genomic DNA of adults from saliva for the purpose of reporting and interpreting genetic health risks and reporting carrier status. It is not intended to diagnose any disease. Your ethnicity may affect the relevance of each report and how your genetic health risk results are interpreted. Each genetic health risk report describes if a person has variants associated with a higher risk of developing a disease, but does not describe a person’s overall risk of developing the disease. The test is not intended to tell you anything about your current state of health, or to be used to make medical decisions, including whether or not you should take a medication, how much of a medication you should take, or determine any treatment. Our carrier status reports can be used to determine carrier status, but cannot determine if you have two copies of any genetic variant. These carrier reports are not intended to tell you anything about your risk for developing a disease in the future, the health of your fetus, or your newborn child's risk of developing a particular disease later in life. For certain conditions, we provide a single report that includes information on both carrier status and genetic health risk.


Still have questions? Contact Us

Submit a request

Facebook

Twitter

Phone
1-800-239-5230
Mon - Fri
6am - 8pm PT
Sat - Sun
8am - 4pm PT
Follow
Was this article helpful?
21 out of 110 found this helpful